Jul 222013
 
The Parks of Seattle Project

If you haven’t been following the Parks of Seattle project, you’re missing out. Dave Battjes has decided to create a logo for each and every one of the 400 plus parks and green spaces in the city of Seattle. For almost a year, since August of 2012, Dave has produced logos in a wide variety of styles. Each completed logo is posted on his blog, Parks of Seattle where you can see them all. It’s fascinating subject matter and Dave’s logos evoke not only a sense of each park, but an overall sense of the Pacific Northwest and Seattle. With 400 …continue reading

Jul 112013
 
Growing Rivers of Flowers in the City

If you visit London, you may just notice trails of flowers winding through the city humming with pollinators. River of Flowers is the brainchild of Kathryn Lwin and while started in London, it now winds through much of the U.K. and is currently expanding into Europe and North America. The idea is simple and starts with the desire to create a connecting pathway of flowering plants for pollinators. Then you find and map three wild spaces in the area and finally partner with the local community to plant the areas in between with flowering plants. In more detail however, they …continue reading

Jun 172013
 
Wildlife Plants:: Lavender

There are few other plants so closely associated with scent than Lavender. The purple flowers and gray/green foliage is unmistakable and found in gardens around the world. The various forms can grow from ground high up to waist high and it is used and appreciated by both humans and wildlife. Lavandula (more commonly known as Lavender) is in the mint family and the genus contains a complicated taxonomy with 39 species and countless cultivars. Lavendula angustifolia is the most widely cultivated species. It was  historically found in the Old World growing from India throughout the Mediterranean region of Africa and southern Europe. …continue reading

Jun 032013
 
Foragings:: The latest news, resources, designs and more

News Nature and the City:: “If we are ever to reach the stage where we can value the benefits as ecosystem services, or design therapeutic landscapes, we need to understand what the benefits are and how they operate.” A Wilder Way:: Dutch designer, Piet Oudolf, who is responsible for the planting design of the High Line in New York City, is the subject of this interesting profile. Urban Rivers of Life:: “There are few natural features as important as rivers and streams in defining cities, in shaping sense of place, and in connecting us with nature.” First Person: Letting a Backyard …continue reading

May 232013
 
On Being Misunderstood:: Dogwood

On Being Misunderstood is a feature at The Metropolitan Field Guide which will look at the variety of flora and fauna we live with which are too commonly misunderstood. From plants to wildlife, many of our daily interactions with these species are often negative or confused. Many of these reactions are based on misinformation. This new feature seeks to combat these misconceptions by bringing in guest writers to explain some of these species to us so we all have a better understanding and to set the record straight.  If you would like to contribute to this series as a guest writer, contact …continue reading

May 212013
 
Interview with Julie Feinstein

Julie Feinstein is a Collection Manager at the American Museum of Natural History. She lives in New York City and writes about urban wildlife on her blog, Urban Wildlife Guide. She has recently published a fantastic book (which I’ll be reviewing soon) titled Field Guide to Urban Wildlife. You may remember her from her guest post about House Centipedes in the ‘On Being Misunderstood’ feature. She was good enough to answer some questions about her inspiration, experience and knowledge about urban wildlife. What does a collections manager at a natural history museum do? In addition to exhibits and educational displays, natural history …continue reading